Carlisle’s Old Public Graveyard


The only map available for visiting the graveyard was found on the Internet. Sadly, it was not accurate enough to allow finding all of the significant memorials and markers.
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Overview of the graveyard. Most of the descriptions of individual graves in this album are copied from the map found at https://res.cloudinary.com/simpleview/image/upload/v1466638199/clients/cumberland/carlislesoldpublicgraveyard_c87ccb2d-97ba-f7e3-12085ca8e6de3de6.pdf.
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The Old Graveyard was Carlisle's first burial ground. The oldest surviving marker is dated 1757, six years after Carlisle founding in 1751.
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750 veterans from the Revolutionary War through the Korean War are buried here.
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The "New Section" of the graveyard was laid out in 1891.
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One of the few true paths in the graveyard. Rows were not numbered and it was difficult to find the significant graves.
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Lutheran Monument. In 1891 bodies from the Lutheran graveyard on S. Hanover & Chestnut Ave. were reinterred on the SE corner plot of the graveyard.
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Mausoleums
Mausoleums were popular from the end of the 1800s and declined in the early 1900s about the same
time as the income tax was enacted. There is only one mausoleum in the Old Graveyard. The door hinges are a
classical symbol of funeral iconography. They are torches: up for life; down for death.
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White Bronzes
Neither white nor bronze, “White Bronzes” were made of zinc that turned blue during a casting process. An American invention in the 1870s, cast sections were bolted inside, making these grave markers hollow. (Give
it a tap.) They look just as they did over 100 years ago! (We did give it a tap).
There are only about a dozen in the country prior to
1900.
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At the top of this monument is the fraternal symbol of the Masons. It should be visible when the photo is enlarged to full size.
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One grave holds the remains of Robert Young Stuart, Chief Forester of the United State who was responsible for the first comprehensive assessment of American forests. Grandma and Grandpa looked for it for quite some time, but only found numerous other graves for members of the Stuart family, never his. This photo shows several of those graves.
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Molly Pitcher Statue
The statue of Revolutionary War Heroine “Molly Pitcher” was erected in 1916 by the State of Pennsylvania. J. Otto Schweizer, a prominent monument sculptor from Philadelphia was commissioned to design the statue. His signature is on the side. Molly’s likeness is based on a composite of features from her female descendants. Molly Pitcher’s actual grave is behind the monument marked with an 1876 grave marker. Her real name: Mary Hays McCauley.
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Molly Pitcher's grave.
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Monument to Revolutionary Ware soldiers buried in the Old Public Graveyard erected in 1930 by the Cumberland County (Pennsylvania) chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.
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Other side of the Revolutionary War Monument.
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General Thompson's marker.
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Close-up of the inscription.
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Close-up of the inscription at the foot of the grave.
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Grave of John Bannister Gibson, 1780-1853, Chief Justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court for 24 years. The fence enclosure is supposed to have been done by Robert Wood, the "premier designer and manufacturer on the East Cost in the mid to late 1800s for decorative cast iron Victorian ironwork."
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Civil War drummer boy for the 1st U.S. Calvary, Charles Seebold.