Arbat
Mickey D's, at the far end of the Arbat.
Arbat
Arbat
This photo, but without the many cars, is what the Arbat looked like about 15 years ago when Grandpa Roy was there. In fact, it looked even drabbier. (MacDonald's on the left and an unnamed concert hall on the right).
Arbat
Arbat
This is what the Arbat looks like today. New lights, new facades to the buildings, new shops, beautiful!
Arbat
Arbat
The street pedlars are still there selling everything from books to cheap knock-offs of Soviet-era regalia, but it is all new or being restored. Fifteen years ago it was only street pedlars.
Arbat
Arbat
The few shops were hidden behind small doors, where Americans, in particular, were greeted suspiciously. Today all that has changed.
Arbat
Arbat
Arbat musician. He has his own amplifier.
Arbat
Arbat
Landscapes for sale.
Arbat
Arbat
"Russian Souveniers."
Arbat
Arbat
Lunch on the Arbat for the Great Green Group was at the Moscow Hard Rock Cafe.
Arbat
Arbat
Had it been earlier, the group could have eaten at the Arbat's Dunkin' Donuts.
Arbat
Arbat
Starbucks was at number 38 Arbat Street.
Arbat
Arbat
Wendy's proclaimed that "quality is our recipe."
Arbat
Arbat
The Georgian "Genatsvale" restaurant proudly proclaimed it is on the Arbat, though it actually is around the corner on New Arbat.
Arbat
Arbat
Of course Grandpa Roy had to get a photo of the "Aeroflot Russian Airlines" ticket office on the Arbat.
Arbat
Arbat
Sculpture along the Arbat.
Arbat
Arbat
A golden dancer along the Arbat.
Arbat
PICT0168-1
An unidentified church which greatly resembles, but most definitely is not, the Church of the Savior on Sand on the Arbat. The bell tower, for one thing, is shorter than that of the "Sand" church.