Limones
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Village police station.
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Taco stand in Limones.
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Many villages have public water turned on only several hours a day. Each home fills water tanks such as these so that they have water the rest of the day for cooking, washing and bathing. The tanks are not very large. They appeared to Grandpa to hold about 60 gallons of water.
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Rear of the only Mayan pyramid in Limones.
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Front of the pyramid. A few years ago archaeologists made some excavations and found the remains of three girls who had been sacrificed there hundreds of years ago.
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Our guide, Geraldo, explains the history of the pyramid and the surrounding area.
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Ceiba tree, considered by the ancient Maya to be the tree of life.
Limones, Mexico
Ceiba Tree
Notice the sharp "needles" on the branches of the ceiba tree. For interesting information about the tree, see http://www.ceiba.org/ceiba.htm.
Ceiba Tree
Limones, Mexico
Grandpa stands in the shade of the Ceiba tree.
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Grandpa heading back to the bus after visiting the pyramid. Inside the building were a few vendors with souveniers, but neither Grandpa nor Grandma bought anything.
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Limones, Mexico
Mayan Village
Our hostess and her granddaughter greet the visitors at the entrance to their home in the Mayan village in Limones.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Gardens behind the home.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
The home from the rear. Notice the satellite dish. In the foreground of the photo is a pit where delicious chicken is prepared by cooking in the ground covered with hot coals.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Geraldo invites the visitors to sit around the pit where the chicken is nearly ready to be removed from the pit.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Our host removes the palm fronds and dirt covering the pit as Geraldo explains what is going on.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
The pot of chicken is carefully removed from the pit. The pot itself is made from a type of gourd. It is not made from clay.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Geraldo shows off the palm fronds and explains their use.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Our host and hostess prepare chicken tacos for the visitors. The two small bowls in front contain, on the left, a hot sauce, and on the right, a mild sauce. Grandpa thought the hot sauce was awfully mild considering how it had been described. It did taste good on the chicken, though.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Geraldo explained the use for this fruit. Grandpa Roy forgot it.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
The Mayans used, and still use, the fruit from all the different trees.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Yet another useful fruit.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
Rope was made from the fronds of this plant many years ago. It finally was abandoned when nylon came along because so many people were required to scrape the plant down to the fibers.
Mayan Village
Mayan Village
The water from this well looked perfectly pure; however, the minerals in it cause weakening bones and other illnesses.
Mayan Village